Archive for January, 2013

We’re Strong and Everywhere: Statement from an Arch Coal Disrupting Activist

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013
posted by admin

Coal has always been in the forefront of my life. A UMWA pension is what kept food in my stomach and a roof over my head. The lure of the mines has attracted most of my family, a majority of the folks I went to school with, some of my greatest allies, and a group of pro coal protesters who serve as the little dutch boy with their finger in the damn. (more…)

Make Them Listen: Statement from an Arch Coal Disrupting Activist

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013
posted by mlr

Margaret Fetzer

I am here at Arch today because a few people here have been making decisions on behalf of all of us and they have been sacrificing the health of communities in Appalachia and across the world for their quarterly profits. Capitalism does not answer to communities, it only consumes them; we must resist this and reclaim our health and freedom. Accountability is only possible when the perpetrators of a crime are answerable to their actions. This is only possible when we come together and listen. (more…)

Fight Like Hell for the Living: Statement from an Arch Coal Disrupting Activist

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013
posted by mlr

Anna-Louise Long

The first time that I learned about the reality of mountaintop removal I was in Alabama, being guided through the woods by a man across what had been his family’s land. He had lost it to the coal companies, but to him it was still his. He led us through the woods, and the closer we got to the mine the more barren, dead the forest became with the water levels rising where they shouldn’t be. As we looked out over the mine with the backdrop of massive machines bigger than houses, I remember him choking up, saying, “I don’t want this to be my family’s legacy.”

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Activists Disrupt Arch Coal Corporate HQ

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013
posted by admin

UPDATE 4:41 pm CST: All activists have been removed after disrupting business as usual at Arch Coal for over 6 hours.  We are still waiting on final confirmation of bail and charges. What a great day!

UPDATE: 3:27 pm CST: One activist is still locked down. The corrected bail amount is $1,000.

UPDATE 2:51 pm CST: Four of the activists have been cut out by the Fire Dept.  Three others remain attached to our potted plant.  Those that have been arrested were set a $10,000 bail.

UPDATE 11:03 am CST:  Supporter that sang this great song to Arch Coal have dispersed from the building. Fire Dept is on scene to attempt to remove activists locked down upstairs.

Activists Occupy Arch Coal Corporate HQ

Seven locked to each other and a 500-pound potted tree, blocking entrance to Arch Coal's HQ office.

Seven locked to each other and a 500-pound potted tree, blocking entrance to Arch Coal’s HQ office.

CREVE COEUR, MO —  Seven affiliated with the RAMPS campaign (Radical Action for Mountain Peoples’ Survival), MORE (Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment) and Mountain Justice are locked down to a 500-pound small potted tree in Arch Coal’s third-floor headquarters while a larger group is in the lobby performing a song and dance.  Additionally, a helium balloon banner with the message “John Eaves Your Coal Company Kills”, directed at the Arch Coal CEO was released in at the Arch Coal headquarters.

Seven protesters locked down outside the corporate office of Arch Coal.

Seven protesters locked down outside the corporate office of Arch Coal.

 

“We’re here to halt Arch’s operations for as long as we can. These coal corporations do not answer to communities, they only consume them.  We’re here to resist their unchecked power,” explained Margaret Fetzer, one of the protestors.

Arch Coal, the second largest coal company in the U.S., operates strip mines in Appalachia and in other U.S. coal basins. Strip mining is an acutely destructive and toxic method of mining coal, and resource extraction disproportionately impacts marginalized communities.

“From the Battle of Blair Mountain to the current fight with the Patriot pensions, the people of central Appalachia have been fighting against the coal companies for the past 125 years. The struggle continues today as we take action to hold Arch Coal and other coal companies accountable for the damage that they do to people and communities in Appalachia and around the world. Coal mining disproportionately impacts indigenous peoples, and we stand in solidarity with disenfranchised people everywhere,”  Dustin Steele of Mingo County, W.Va. said.  Steele was one of the people locked in Arch’s office.

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